Garlic

Nigella’s Chicken Shawarma

Chicken Shwarma 2

I’ve avoided  posting this recipe because I didn’t want you to think I was some sort of crazed Nigella fan/stalker such is the large number of her recipes on this blog.

However, this has become such a ‘go to’ recipe when I have to feed lots of people for a buffet type spread (and so many people have asked me for the recipe) that I’ve finally caved in.

This is a wonderfully simple recipe and whilst you do need a well stocked spice cupboard there’s nothing really specialist involved. It also makes good use of chicken thighs which still remain economical even if you buy them from a quality butcher (which I always do).

I cut the chicken into thin slices which makes it go along way and serve either with rice (easy) or homemade flat breads (a bit more effort). As an accompaniment Nigella mixes up a tahini and garlic flavoured yoghurt bejewelled with pomegranate seeds but I don’t bother with this.

Nigella’s Chicken Shawarma

Serves 6 (or more if you’re serving as part of a buffet with other dishes)

  • 12 skinless and boneless chicken thighs (I like to remove as much of the visible fat as possible)
  • The grated zest and juice of two lemons
  • 100 ml of regular olive oil
  • 4 fat or 6 smaller garlic cloves grated
  • 2 dried or fresh bay leaves
  • 2 teaspoons of paprika
  • 2 teaspoons of ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons of sea salt flakes
  • 1 teaspoons of ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon of dried chilli flakes
  • ¼ a teaspoon of ground cinnamon
  • ¼ a teaspoon of freshly grated nutmeg

Take a large bowl, tupperware or freezer bag, tip in the chicken thighs and add all the other ingredients.

Squish everything about (hands are best for this) until the chicken is well covered with all the marinade ingredients.

Cover and refrigerate for at least 6 hours or up to 1 day.

When you are ready to cook heat your oven to 200oC fan and take the chicken out of the fridge to come up to room temperature.

Spread the chicken thighs out on to a large baking tray – you may need two because you don’t want them to overlap.

Bake for 30 minutes until golden and slightly crispy on top. I like to turn mine halfway through for an even colour. Sometimes they need slightly longer than 30 minutes.

Take the chicken out of the oven and leave to rest for 5 minutes covered with foil.

Slice the cooked thighs thinly with a sharp knife and place in a sharing bowl for everyone to help themselves.

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Noodles with kale, pork and sesame

kaleporkstirfry.jpg

What I love about the internet is that you can search quickly for a recipe based on what’s in your fridge. There’s no trawling through badly indexed recipe books in the vague hope of finding something suitable.

And the internet is exactly how I found this one – in a rush when we were starving and my husband was reaching for the takeaway menu.

It’s not going to win any gourmet awards but it’s perfectly tasty and a good dish to have in your repertoire of quick, easy (and relatively nutritious) weekday dinners.

Noodles with kale, pork and sesame

Serves 2

  • 2 teaspoons of sesame seeds
  • 250g of pork mince
  • 200g of kale, finely chopped
  • 1 red chilli, finely sliced (or ¼ teaspoons of dried chilli flakes)
  • 1 large garlic clove, finely chopped
  • A thumb sized piece of fresh root ginger, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon of toasted sesame oil
  • 1 ½ tablespoons of kecap manis (Malaysian sweet soy sauce – or use regular soy sauce with a teaspoon of sugar)
  • 3 spring onions, trimmed and shredded
  • A pack of straight to wok noodles (I buy mine from Lidl, you get two small portions in a pack and I use both)

Optional (i.e. don’t be put off making this if you don’t have these in your fridge)

  • A tablespoon of fresh mint, chopped
  • A tablespoon of fresh coriander, chopped
  • Lime wedges or bottled lime juice, to serve

Put the kale in a small saucepan, add a tiny splash of water, put a lid on and turn the heat up high until the water is steaming. Then turn off the heat and leave for a few minutes to wilt.

Stir fry the sesame seeds and pork mince until cooked through and a deep brown colour (about 5 minutes on high). You should not need any extra oil as the mince has a high enough fat content as it is.

Add the kale, chilli, garlic and ginger to the pan and stir over a high heat for a few minutes. Add the kecap manis and sesame oil and stir again. Then add the noodles and stir fry until the noodles are cooked through. Finally add the spring onions and fresh herbs and mix well.

Serve with lime wedges.

Lazy fish tacos

fish tacos

It has been far too hot this week for extravagant cooking.

I never lose my appetite in the heat (this only ever happens when I’m really, really poorly) but I do change the way that I eat – grazing lazily on smaller dishes throughout the day rather than wanting big, hot food.

In this summer weather I’ve been craving fresh, simply cooked fish and this recipe is just perfect. It’s basically a posh take on a fish finger sandwich (ever so Nigella).

I’m too lazy to bother with the corn relish or the quick pickled onion in the original recipe (find these on the BBC Food website if you like). I just serve the baked fish inside some sort of bread, with whatever salad bits happen to be in the fridge and some sort of sauce – usually mayonnaise and/or chilli sauce.

Nigella’s fish tacos

Serves 4-6

(I made this with 500g of hake and this served 3 generously. I then roughly halved the quantities of spices below)

  • 750-900g of hake (or haddock)
  • 1 teaspoon of ground cumin (or grind your own from whole with a pestle and mortar – it helps to dry fry in a hot pan for a minute first before grinding)
  • ½ a teaspoon of paprika
  • 1 teaspoon of sea salt flakes
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and finely grated or minced
  • 2 tablespoons of regular olive oil

Preheat your oven to 200C fan.

Skin and remove any pin bones from the fish fillets (or ask your fishmonger to do this for you). Then cut into longish chunks and arrange in a shallow roasting tin.

Mix together the cumin, paprika and salt, and sprinkle over the fish fillets.

Mix the garlic and the oil in a small bowl. Drizzle the fish with the garlicky oil, and roast in the oven for 8–10 minutes, depending on the thickness of your fillets. Check to see if the fish is cooked through before taking out of the oven.

Serve the fish wrapped in some sort of flatbread. Tortillas and pittas both work well. Bought ones are just fine but the best (if you can be bothered) are homemade – such as my ‘sort of naan’ flatbreads (recipe here). Then add in some sort of salad and sauce of your choice.

Here’s a photo of the baked fish inside a toasted pitta with broad bean hummus (it’s the season) and my new addiction – Sriracha chilli sauce.

fish tacos 2

I’ve realised that there are a lot of Nigella recipes on this blog. If you fancy trying any of the others here’s a recap.

My favourite Nigella recipes

Chocolate Guinness cake (I made this for the first time in ages this week – I’d forgotten how seriously delicious it is and it went down very well with my Bollywood dancing troupe)
Old-fashioned chocolate cake
New York cheesecake (the best cheesecake ever)
Ricotta hotcakes (I make these almost every weekend for my children as a breakfast treat)
Breakfast bars 
Crunchy cornflake coated chicken
Pea and garlic soup

 

Wild garlic pesto

pesto 1

Wild garlic is in season right now and I’m like a woman possessed scouring verges and wooded areas for this completely free food. I’ve even trained my children to be on the lookout. It’s not hard to identify as the garlicky smell is unmistakable (but do check because it does look similar to Lilly of the Valley – which is poisonous). Not a great photo but this is what it looks like.

wildgarlicgrowing

My son Edgar likes to eat it raw in huge handfuls as soon as he’s picked it. I’m sure this is fine for his health  (wild garlic is said to have antibacterial, antibiotic and antiseptic properties) but it doesn’t do much for his breath.

If you live in Nottingham there’s a healthy blanket of wild garlic at Clifton Wood, and on a recent trip to Scarborough I discovered a great bit patch among the walking paths in South Cliff Gardens.

This wild garlic pesto recipe (from a recipe for gluttony) is brilliant. It uses roasted hazelnuts which provide texture. I just added a little lemon juice to cut through the intense garlic flavour. Toss it with some pasta for a quick and easy dinner.

Wild garlic pesto

1/2 of this amount makes enough to generously cover 500g of dried pasta to feed a family of four

  • 100g of wild garlic leaves
  • 75g of hazelnuts (roasted in the oven at 160oC for about 10 minutes and then crushed with a pestle and mortar)
  • 50g of Parmesan cheese (plus more on top if you’re mixing the pesto with pasta)
  • 1/2-1 tsp salt (or to taste)
  • 150ml of good olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon of lemon juice

Put all the ingredients above in a blender and whizz up. Taste and add more salt and lemon juice if necessary.

To store, decant into a sterilised jar and drizzle a thin layer of olive oil evenly over the surface (this will help preserve the colour). Keep in the fridge until needed.

pesto 2

Do not be afraid of GAME – roast haunch of venison

Venison

On the whole I don’t like game, but my husband really does, so in an effort to buy something that might please us both I asked my butcher*, “Can you tell me what is the least gamey sort of game?”.

How dumb? But he just smiled and offered me a rolled, boned, haunch of venison (that looked very much like a joint of beef) and I was so embarrassed by my stupid question that I felt compelled to buy it.

It then sat in my fridge for a week (terrifying me) while I decided what on earth I was going to do with it. Seriously out of my comfort zone I faffed around on the internet looking at various recipes and then tried the following – an amalgamation of a few.

It worked so well that I completely annoyed my husband by going on (and on) about how surprised I was at how good it tasted (it was pure relief, not gloating I promise). Unlike venison I’ve had in the past it was not at all liverish but very tender and possibly even nicer than roast beef.

Roast haunch of venison

  • A 838g haunch of venison, rolled and deboned (see note below)

Marinade

  • 1/2 a bottle of good red wine (I used a light Rijoa)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 sprigs of rosemary
  • 5 juniper berries, roughly crushed
  • 2 cloves of garlic, roughly crushed

To roast

  • 30g of butter
  • 3 slices of bacon, streaky or back, bashed until thin with a rolling pin

Gravy

  • marinade liquor, sieved
  • juices from the roasting pan
  • 1/2 Knorr beef stock pot (or equivalent)
  • a dollop of blackcurrant jam (or other sweet jam)
  • a teaspoon of cornflour ‘slaked’ (guess whose programme I’ve been watching?) with a little water

Bathe the joint for at least 24 hours but for up to two days in the marinade ingredients above.

Take the venison out of the marinade and reserve and strain the liquor. Pat dry and leave uncovered in a cool place for a few hours to dry out a bit. Cover loosely with kitchen roll if you’re worried about flies or other contaminants.

Smear the joint with butter and lay the bacon over the top.

Roast in the oven for 20 minutes at 220oC.

Then another 20 minutes at 170oC.

Take out of the oven and leave to rest, covered in tin foil, for 15 minutes.

For the gravy, boil the sieved marinade until the alcohol has burned off and it has reduced by about a quarter. Add the stock pot and the juices from the roasting pan. Then stir in the cornflour mixture and cook on a medium heat, stirring all the time, until thickened. Add the jam. Taste and season with salt and pepper if you think it necessary.

Carve the venison and serve with the gravy.

I served mine with peas and pommes coq d’or (you need to scroll down the page, past the gammon, for the recipe).

NOTES:

*Coates Traditional Butchers, Bramcote Lane, Wollaton – I’m not saying this because I want freebies or discounts, I just want people to support really good butchers. If you live this side of Nottingham then please use Coates instead of the Waitrose round the corner.

There are no photos of the venison because I was so convinced it was going to be awful that I didn’t have the camera ready.

If you have a different weight of meat (very likely) here’s the maths to work out the cooking time. Weigh your meat in grams and get a calculator. Whatever the weight cook for 20 minutes at 220oC. Then multiply the weight of your meat (in grams) by  0.024 and that is how long you need to cook it for at 170oC. This is for medium rare.

Use any leftover meat to make rissoles. I use a Delia recipe which will probably appear here soon.

Pea and garlic soup

pea and garlic soup

I may be glowing with the success of my garlic crop but I don’t talk about my peas (which never even germinated). Luckily this recipe (based on a Nigella  one) uses frozen peas rather than fresh.

Don’t be put off by the amount of garlic – once roasted the flavour is mellow and sweet and not at all over powering. I’m not a fan of super creamy soups so I have reduced the amount of butter and cheese by half, and I don’t bother with double cream which I think dulls the flavour.

Pea and garlic soup

Serves 4

  • 2 large heads of garlic
  • 4 teaspoons of olive oil
  • 400g of frozen peas
  • 400ml chicken or vegetable stock
  • 25g of butter (Nigella uses double this amount)
  • 2 tablespoons of freshly grated Parmesan (Nigella uses double this amount)
  • 300ml of double cream (optional)

Cut the very top off the head of garlic so that you can just see the tops of the cloves. Cut out a square of tin foil, sit the garlic in the middle, drizzle over 2 teaspoons of olive oil and then make a loose parcel with the tin foil around the garlic, sealing at the top. Repeat with the other head.

Bake in an oven preheated to 180oC for an hour until soft.

Squeeze the soft cloves of garlic out of their skins into a food processor.

Heat the chicken stock in a pan, add the frozen peas and cook over a medium heat for a couple of minutes until the peas are thawed and warmed through. Add the peas and stock to the food processor.

Add the butter and Parmesan then process until creamy.

Pour the mixture back into the saucepan and heat gently. Add salt and pepper to taste and a little cream if you think it necessary – I don’t.

NOTE: This is great served with homemade baguettes (find the recipe here)

 

Chicken with 40 cloves of garlic and homemade baguettes

chicken with 40 cloves of garlic

In my small collection of recipe books there are at least four versions of ‘chicken with 40 cloves of garlic’ and I’ve always promised myself that if I ever have a bumper crop of garlic this would be the first thing I would cook.

Finally this year (after over 10 years of having an allotment) I have struck gold with my garlic and I feel as though I can spare 40 cloves for just one dish.

lovely garlic

My beautiful garlic.

But which recipe should I use? In the end I opted for the most straight forward sounding one – Alistair Little’s in Nigel Slater’s ‘Real Food’. When I found the original programme from 1998 where they cook this recipe and saw them serve it with nothing more than bread and wine, I knew I was onto a winner.

This dish is certainly delicious, but despite all the fuss (i.e. chefs falling over themselves to bring you ‘their’ version) it is basically roast chicken with garlicky gravy and some roasted garlic on the side. I do love this simplicity but the best bit for me was the bread accompaniment (see recipe below) and the smell filling our kitchen as the garlic and chicken were roasting.

Chicken with forty cloves of garlic

(based on Alistair Little’s in Nigel Slater’s ‘Real Food’ with some alterations)

Serves a family of four with leftovers for sandwiches and stock

  • A good quality free range chicken weighing about 2kg
  • A lemon
  • Salt and pepper
  • Some olive oil
  • 40 large cloves of young garlic (this is about 4 bulbs)
  • A sprig of fresh rosemary
  • A couple of bay leaves
  • 250g chicken stock

Preheat the oven to 240oC. Cut the lemon in half and put into the cavity of the chicken. Drizzle some olive oil over the outside of the chicken, season well with salt and pepper, and rub in with your hands. Bake in the oven for 25 minutes until golden brown.

Meanwhile, prepare the garlic. Break up the bulbs into cloves, you don’t need to peel but remove any really dry skin that comes off easily with your fingers. Take the chicken out of the oven, scatter the garlic, rosemary and bay leaves around it, lower the heat to 200oC and return to the oven for another hour.

chicken and garlic

When the chicken is cooked, tip out the lemon and remove it from the roasting tin onto a serving plate. Then use a slotted spoon to remove nearly all the garlic cloves and put those on the serving plate as well (save 3 or 4 in the tin to mash into the gravy).

Give everything left in the roasting tin a good mash with a fork (including the lemons). Then add the chicken stock and put over the hob stirring well with a wooden spoon to get all the bits off the bottom of the tin. Let it bubble away for a couple  of minutes until you have a light gravy. Strain into a serving jug and serve with the chicken.

NOTE: In my books very little is said about how exactly you go about serving/eating this dish. This is what we did and whilst it wasn’t very elegant it was a lot of fun. Carve big chunks of chicken, pour over the gravy, eat with roughly cut baguettes (see recipe below) spreading the garlic onto the bread and dipping it into the gravy. Get stuck in, use your fingers and don’t forget the wine.

chicken with 40 cloves of garlic the table

Ben’s baguettes

baguettes

This is a simplified version of the recipe handed out to my husband Ben when he attended the French Baking course at the School of Artisan Food. Ben has made these many times and in our view the simplifications don’t affect the finished product at all.

I bought the course as a present for his birthday and without meaning to be selfish it has turned out to be a present for the whole family. Food-wise there are few things better than fresh baguettes for breakfast – especially when they are made by someone else.

Makes 6 small baguettes (about 30cm length), or 4 larger ones (the same length but fatter)

  • 640g of strong bread flour
  • 415ml of water
  • 10g of salt
  • 6g of yeast

Mix all the dry ingredients together and then add the water and mix with your hands until it comes together.

Knead the dough for 10 minutes. Shape into a ball and place in a bowl covered with cling film for at least a couple of hours to rise but you can leave it for up to 4. It should come nearly to the top of a large mixing bowl.

bread rising

Knock back the dough with your hands, bring into a ball and divide into 4 or 6 equal portions, depending on the size you want.

Shape each portion into a sausage pulling out length-ways at first and then rolling to even out. Don’t worry if they look a bit rough.

Now you’ll need a tea towel which is impregnated with flour (Ben has one of these set aside for this purpose). Lay the tea towel over a high sided baking tray letting it hang over the sides. Put one baguette along one edge of the tray and then make a fold in the tea towel next to the baguette so that it comes up the side. Then lay the next baguette on the other side of the fold. Repeat this for the third and fourth baguettes. The purpose of this is to stop the baguettes touching each other and to avoid having to buy a special baguette tray. It’s a bit tricky to explain so here is a photo.

baguettes in the tin

Use the same technique for the others using another tray. Allow to prove for about an hour.

Transfer the baguettes to some thin baking trays scattered with a little flour or semolina to stop them sticking. I used two with three on each. This is quite a tricky process as the dough is quite floppy. Try not to knock out the air that has been created but don’t worry too much if the shape isn’t perfect.

Slash the tops diagonally across with a very sharp knife and bake at 250oC for 12-15 minutes (for the 6 smaller ones), or 20 mins (for 4).

Allow to cool a little (if you can wait that long) and serve.

NOTE: To reheat cook in the oven at 250oC for 3-5 minutes until crispy.

Orzo with purple sprouting broccoli, lemon and ricotta

orzo

It’s a busy time of year down at the allotment and this week we’ve been planting potatoes, broad beans, french beans and onions. Our reward for all this hard work was some super fresh purple sprouting broccoli which had appeared, as if by magic (we didn’t plant it), right in the middle of our cabbage patch. It had survived huge dumps of snow, a collapsed cabbage cage and very hungry pigeons.

Purple sprouting broccoli always brings to mind this recipe (based on one from Waitrose Kitchen magazine). It has a subtle, fresh and healthy taste. It is also really quick to cook. We ate it outdoors for the first time this year and felt very summery and full of hope.

PS. Orzo is my new favourite thing. It’s basically pasta shaped like rice and you can buy it in most supermarkets, although it is a bit more expensive than regular pasta. My children love it, especially mixed with cheese, butter and frozen peas to make a risotto like dish (without all the stirring).

Orzo with purple sprouting broccoli, lemon and ricotta

Serves 4

  • 2 tablespoons of good olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely sliced
  • 1 green chilli, finely chopped (optional)
  • 400g of orzo
  • 230g of purple sprouting broccoli or thereabouts (this is the prepared uncooked weight)
  • The zest of one lemon
  • The juice of half a lemon
  • 100-200g of ricotta cheese
  • Salt and pepper

Heat two tablespoons of olive oil in a wok or frying pan, heat until smoking then remove from the heat and add the garlic and chilli (if using). Give it a quick stir and set aside.

Cook the orzo according to the packet instructions (or until just cooked through which is often longer than the packet says in my experience). Meanwhile, prepare the broccoli by separating the florets and leaves from the stalks and slicing finely any thick stalks. One minute before the orzo is cooked (you’ll just have to use your best guess here) add the broccoli to the boiling water. Then drain both.

Return the wok/frying pan to a medium heat and add the drained orzo and broccoli to the flavoured oil. Give everything a good stir, then add the lemon zest and juice and season well with salt and pepper.

To serve, crumble over the ricotta cheese and drizzle over a little more olive oil.

Note: If you’re an avid carnivore who needs meat with every meal, then sprinkle some crispy fried bacon over the top.

This dish would also make a good accompaniment for a piece of grilled chicken or fish, or as a cold dish as part of a bigger buffet.

Linguine with hazelnuts, parsley and garlic

linguine with hazelnuts, parsley and garlic 2

It’s half term and we’ve been in Scarborough eating lots of gluttonous seaside food. Amazing fish & chips at the Magpie Cafe and giant ice cream sundaes at the Harbour Bar, but also things I’m a bit ashamed of, like ready-made pizzas from Sainsburys Local and my first McDonald’s hamburger in about five years (which, after a fair amount of rose wine, I declared was the most delicious thing I’d ever eaten!!!).

So for most of the week I’ve entered the kitchen only to turn on the oven and remove packaging. And on our return yesterday I was still in holiday  ‘I can’t be bothered to cook’ mode but we had to have something for dinner so I made this super quick pasta dish.

I tried the recipe for the first time a couple of weeks ago and I’ve got a feeling it’s going to become a staple in our house. It’s easy to make but a bit different to your usual pasta and sauce.

The original recipe (by Olia Hercules for the Guardian) is made with spaetzle (tiny egg dumplings that you make by pushing batter through a colander) but these are a faff to make and I’m not a huge fan of the texture so I make it with linguine instead.

Linguine with hazelnuts, parsley and garlic

For two

  • 200-300g of linguine (depending on appetite)
  • 70g of hazelnuts
  • 2 large garlic cloves, crushed with a little sea salt
  • 50g of parmesan cheese, grated
  • Two good handfuls of parsley, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons of good olive oil, plus a bit more for drizzling
  • Some sea salt

First toast the hazelnuts in an oven heated to 180oC for 8 minutes, or until golden brown. Roughly crush the nuts in a pestle and mortar or chop finely with a knife. I buy my hazelnuts unblanched from Lidl (where they’re cheapest) and find that once roasted the skins come off really easily.

Put the nuts, garlic, parsley, oil and parmesan in a large bowl and mix.

Cook the linguine according to the packet instructions, then drain and toss into the bowl with the other ingredients and stir until well coated. Serve immediately with a little extra olive oil drizzled over the top and a good sprinkling of  sea salt (although these are optional and can be left out if you’re watching your fat/salt content).

Serve with a green salad on the side if you’re worried about the absence of greens, and a large glass of crisp, white wine if you like.

Stir fried chicken with ketchup

chicken and ketchup 2

For those of you who read my last post and dismissed it out of hand because of the ridiculously long list of ingredients, I bring you another chicken and rice dish with very few.

I know that stir frying with ketchup does sound a bit odd but I promise you that it works and the taste/effort ratio is very good. My husband (who hates ketchup and gave me an evil look when I told him what was for dinner) was extremely surprised by how tasty it was. In essence it’s a cheat’s version of sweet and sour chicken and it apparently has the same Manchurian origins.

This Mark Bittman recipe is from the Cooking section of the NY Times online which is fast becoming my favourite lunchtime read. I’ve converted the cup measurements to grams, and added my usually ramblings (in brackets), but have changed little else about the recipe.

Mark Bittman’s stir fried chicken with ketchup

Serves 2-4

  • 680g of boneless chicken, which is roughly three breasts, cut into 1 inch chunks (Mark uses dark meat but I prefer whiter meat for quick cooking)
  • About 60g of flour, plus more as needed
  • 4 tablespoons of neutral oil like groundnut
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 tablespoons of slivered garlic (roughly 6 large cloves)
  • ¼ teaspoon of cayenne pepper
  • 225g ketchup (I used my favourite Polish Pudliszki ketchup – which they sell in Tesco)

First, toss the chicken with flour so that it’s lightly dusted. Put 1 tablespoon of oil in a large non-stick frying pan and turn the heat to high. When the oil smokes, add your chopped chicken in one layer. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. (For this amount of chicken with a 23 cm based frying pan I needed to cook the chicken in two batches to avoid over-crowding the pan).

When the chicken browns on one side, toss it over and cook until just about done (for me this was 5 minutes). Remove to a plate (and cook the second batch of chicken with an another 1 tablespoon of oil). Turn off the heat and let the pan cool for a moment.

Add the remaining oil to pan (2 tablespoons) and turn the heat to medium high. Add the garlic and cayenne pepper and cook (for about a minute until the garlic browns slightly, stirring all the time so that it doesn’t burn).

Add the ketchup and stir. Cook until the ketchup bubbles, then darkens slightly (this took me 3 minutes, if in doubt have a taste, if the sauce still tastes like ketchup then keep cooking, when it’s ready it will taste completely different – caramelised and sweet with just a hint of sour).

Return the chicken to the pan and stir to coat with sauce. Serve with rice (I used my usual Delia method with the addition of two star anise – for the recipe see my post ‘Nice Rice’).