lemon juice

Milk sorbet

milk sorbet 2

I don’t eat out a lot but last year I was lucky enough to try milk sorbet TWICE at two different restaurants.

The first was at ‘The Peacock‘ in Rowsley where it was the perfect companion to a dense chocolate tart. The second was at the wonderful ‘John’s House‘ in Mount Sorrel where it came on top of a hot rice pudding – an odd sounding pairing but an absolute delight.

After these two memorable food experiences I decided to try and make it myself. This recipe from Donna Hay was the first that came up on a google search and I haven’t bothered to try any others because it is perfect.

We are divided in our family as to whether milk sorbet is preferable to a good old-fashioned vanilla ice cream but I’m totally convinced that it is better in some circumstances, such as with very rich deserts where it offers a lighter and more refreshing note of contrast. It is great just on its own though (I seem to say that a  lot on this blog).

You will need an ice-cream maker for this recipe. As I’ve said before, I have a Magimix Le Glacier ice cream maker – the cheaper sort where you have to freeze the bowl overnight before using. This remains one of my best used kitchen appliances*.

*PS. I have not been paid by Magimix to say this.

Donna Hay’s Milk Sorbet

  • 1 cup/220g of caster sugar
  • 1 cup/250ml of water
  • 3 cups/650ml of full fat milk (I used Tesco Finest Channel Island milk)
  • 2 tablespoons of lemon juice

Place the sugar and water in a saucepan over high heat and stir until dissolved. Bring to the boil and cook for 4 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Set aside and allow to cool completely.

Once cool add the milk and lemon juice.

Churn in an ice-cream maker until firm (about 20 minutes) and freeze until required.

You will need to leave the sorbet at room temperature for around 30 minutes before serving.


Yotam Ottolenghi’s puy lentils


I celebrated the end of a vegetarian Lent with scampi and chicken bites at Scarborough’s wonderful Clock Café. This is my favourite cafe in the world, it’s fabulously old school with a menu that probably hasn’t changed in 40 years.

The next day I ate battered fish with chips at Whitby’s Quayside restaurant and was very happy.

The week before all that, when I was still being a vegetarian, I finally managed to make an Ottolenghi recipe work. I’m a big fan of red lentil dhal, which is a staple of mine, but this was the first time I’d attempted to cook with puy lentils which I’ve been told are tricky.

It was very tasty (even though I forgot the tiny sliced onion which I’d painstakingly prepared) but this is not surprising considering the amount of butter and oil involved. The cold hardboiled egg garnish really worked well with the hot lentils.

I have one more vegetarian recipe to tell you about next week. Bet you can’t wait.

Yotam Ottolenghi’s puy lentils

Serves 2

  • 200g of puy lentils
  • 30g of butter
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil, plus extra for drizzling
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
  • 1 teaspoon of ground cumin
  • 3 medium tomatoes, skinned and cut into 1cm squares (I used a third of a tin of tinned tomatoes, chopped)
  • 25g of coriander leaves, roughly chopped
  • 4 tablespoons of tahini paste
  • 2 tablespoons of lemon juice
  • Salt and black pepper
  • ½ a small red onion, peeled and sliced very thin
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, quartered

Bring a pan of water to a boil. Add the lentils and cook according to the pack instructions until completely cooked, drain and set aside. Yotam suggested that this would take 15-20 minutes. My packet suggested cooking for 60 minutes but I found they were done after half an hour. If you can squash a lentil easily between your fingers then they are done.

Put the butter and oil in a frying pan and place on a medium-high heat. Once the butter melts, add the garlic and cumin, and cook for a minute. Add the tomatoes, 20g of coriander and the cooked lentils and cook for a couple of minutes stirring all the time.

Then add the tahini, lemon juice, 70ml of water, a teaspoon of salt and a good grind of black pepper. Turn down the heat to medium and cook for a few minutes more, stirring all the time until hot and thickened. Roughly mash the lentils with a potato masher, so that some are broken up.

If at any time it looks too thick then you can add a little more water.

Serve on a platter with the sliced onion, the rest of the coriander, a drizzle of olive oil and the hard boiled eggs on the side.

Serve with homemade flat bread (or bought naan or pitta if you can’t be bothered).